FAQ's

FAQ's

Most Frequently Asked Questions about Bottled Water

What are the most common types of bottled water?

There are many different types of bottled water but the three most common types are Spring Water, Distilled Water and Reverse Osmosis Water.

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Is distilled water natural?

No. First of all Distilled Water is usually city tap water witch has been processed multiple times. Then it often has other multiple processes to remove the chlorine prior to distillation. Here are a couple of websites if you want to know more about distilled water.
http://chetday.com/distilledwater.htm

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Is there a big difference between Distilled Water and Reverse Osmosis Water?

Not really. The purification process is different but the product is very much the same. Both waters are pure. No harmful chemicals, no beneficial minerals.

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Is bottled water regulated differently than tap water?

Yes. Bottled water is extensively regulated as a food product by federal, provincial and association standards. Tap water by contrast is only regulated as a utility by the provinces. Although the federal government established the Canadian Drinking Water Guidelines, they have only been legislated in several provinces and remain legally unenforceable elsewhere. By contrast bottled water regulations are legally enforceable throughout Canada.

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Is bottled water different from tap water?

Yes. Bottled water is different from tap water in many ways. One major difference is the water source. Municipalities generally draw their water supply from surface water (lakes, rivers, etc.) which may be subject to contamination. Most bottled water (more than 75%) originates from protected underground sources. The distribution systems for tap and bottled water are a second important difference. While municipal water distribution systems often rely on kilometers of antiquated piping, bottled water products are produced in food plants and packaged in clean, sealed containers. Lastly, bottled water does not contain any chlorine or chlorine by-products (trihalomethanes or THM's). Instead of chlorine, many bottlers use ozone, a form of oxygen, or ultraviolet light to ensure there are no bacteria present. In addition, chlorinated tap water sometimes contains an off taste or odour which is not present in bottled water. Lead and aluminum can also be found in tap water but not in bottled water.

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Is all spring water the same?

No. Every Spring Water has a different mineral content. For health benefits, you would want to choose water that is moderately high in TDS (total dissolved solids). For example between 200 to 350 PPM (parts per million) in TDS. The most important minerals in Spring Water would be Calcium and Magnesium. The Magnesium content should be between 20 to 40 PPM and calcium 40 to 80 PPM for optimum health. Here are a few websites if you want to know more about Mineral Water.
http://www.mgwater.com/fdapr.shtml
http://www.healthywater.com

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What is the proper way to store bottled water?

Bottled water should be stored in a cool (i.e. room temperature), dry environment away from direct sunlight and chemicals.

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Why do I get a white film floating on top of the water after I boil it?

When boiling water, some of the water vaporizes. The minerals do not rise up with the vapor therefore the minerals separate from the water and are left floating on top of the water. This white film you see mostly contains Calcium and Magnesium.

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When I put ice cubes that I’ve made in my freezer into a glass of water, white stuff appears in the glass when the ice cube has melted. What is the white stuff and where does it come from?

As the ice cube freezes, all of the dissolved minerals in the water are pushed to the center of the ice cube. When the ice cube is completely frozen, the center of the ice cube is concentrated with minerals. When the ice cube is completely melted, “white stuff” floats in your glass of water. This white stuff is the minerals that are no longer dissolved in the water which normally consist of calcium and magnesium.

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What is the difference between spring water vs. Borehole Wells?

You’re willing to pay a premium price for naturally bottled spring water. But, the sad thing is that in some instances, you’re not getting what you pay for. Sure, you can check the label to see if it comes from a city water supply, but how are you going to know if the spring is a natural, free-flowing water source or just another hole drilled in the ground?
Well water bottlers have consumers believing there is no difference between water that is already flowing freely in nature and water that’s pumped out of the ground. But, geologists, chemists, microbiologists and even the Environmental Protection Agency say there is a BIG difference.

The composition and quality of the water changes dramatically when it is pumped out of boreholes. Pumping reverses the natural flow of an aquifer and can draw poorly filtered surface water and contaminants into the water. Spring Water is a Gift from Nature.
Geologists defines spring water as water that freely flows without the aid of mechanical means through an orifice in the Earth’s surface. Boreholes rob a spring of water more quickly than its natural flow can produce. This threatens the life of the spring. French River Springs only captures the water that the spring puts out naturally. We’re not forcing matters. Our springs therefore have time to replenish and literally flow forever.

Here’s how it works:

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